The Artworks

Among us were varied experience levels with this medium.  I had never done simple silk screening, nevermind deconstructive silk screens,

but I took to it immediately.  I love it – it’s a medium that seems second nature to me and, right from the start, I was getting results

that I’ve been trying to achieve with other mediums not as perfectly suitable as this one.  

These are mine:

DSCN8901 web

DSCN8911 web.

DSCN8910 web

dsp with color[6]   

In order to preserve the dye these need to be wrapped in plastic and placed in a warm place for some hours to set.

New ones are already batching.

Cindy cranked out some fun pieces:

IMG_20140919_151502[5]

Diana’s tjanting waxed screen below left which also incorporates the center screen, and on the right, successive prints

and what’s left on the screen in her hands. As you can see, Diana is quite good at this.   She won the Conant grant

from the Potomac Fiber Arts Guild for 2014.  Her journey is chronicled here.

She’s a talented upstart to keep your eyes on!

tjanting waxed screens[2] quick build window screens[2] copy dianas arrowheads[7]

Patricia played with a lovely gourd using many of the techniques we were taught with great results.

                                          pumpkin newspaper resist[6]

patricias pumpkin[6]

 

Left: Sita’s soothing work,” courtesy of Diana G.  Right: one of Judy’s multi-layered DSPs.

sitas soothing palettes[10]          judys work[2]

This is one of Diane’s DSPs.  She has recently published a new book on dying and Procion MX dyes.  You can see it here:

diane working back into fabric[8]

Miki’s DSPs below (again thanks Diana). Canning lids were used to make the first screen and, you can see the screen that made this seashell print here.

           canning jar lids[2]     mikis seashell[2]

It’s crazy that my camera died before I could get so many pics, but that’s the way it was.  One person that I didn’t get any pics of her

or her art is Lois, a great gal!  We connected with one another.  Go here to check her out!

                                                                          Also, Ann produced some fine works and was the only one not to work on textile, but on paper.                                                                             She was working on some stunning works in class but her art can be seen on her own website.

                                                               And Tomi’s pieces are on this page. Sorry if I missed anyone here – I enjoyed being with each one of you!                                                    

And then there was Judy from Cape Cod who was lots of fun but did not want her picture taken!

And finally….drum roll…. the queen bee of DSP herself, and a really fine person as well!

                                                  Kerr’s fabulous piece and exemplar of mark making!                                               

kerrs okra[2]
Once again, this photo is courtesy of Diana Guenther.

Thank you Kerr!